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Tuesday, October 21st 2014
2:39 PM

    ...

lavanwright:

lmsig:

cinnamoneclair:

mrsthyck69:

phatbootypredator:

dacuntgod:

cultureunseen:

STORM & Black Panther…

Relationship goals

Hell freaking yes!!

Waiting for my panther…

I need a husband so we can do this for Halloween!!

The King and Queen

Powerful

Sunday, October 19th 2014
4:45 PM

believeinrecovery:

A little table to how to get rid of all that negative self-talk. We have to learn look at the good in situations too, instead of dwelling on things we can’t change- because you know what? We may not be able to change what is happening but we CAN change how we view it! 

(Source: believeinrecovery, via smalltownboytm)

Sunday, September 28th 2014
11:50 AM

solar-citrus:

You would be surprised with how many people in your life could be going through depression at this very moment.  People hide it like a paper bag over their heads out of fear of being judged, made fun of, seen as weak, or just not taken seriously.  Depression should not be taken lightly, it holds us down from our purpose and potential in life.  Those who tell you that it doesn’t exist have never experienced depression in their life, therefore not understanding the symptoms and how it’s something that cannot be fixed in a day!  So if you think you are depressed or if you think you know someone else who is, please talk to a friend, a family member, or anyone else in your life that you trust - never overlook the possibility of seeing a doctor for more professional help!!  Your feelings are real, your feelings are shared upon millions.  Don’t hide it, talk to someone about it.  With the right help, you can rediscover your confidence and begin life anew with our undying love and support!

We are right here!!

(via incogniri)

Saturday, September 27th 2014
11:00 AM

feeling-fantasmic:

uhh-khakis:

timelordblogging:

allofmylovetess:

dlubes:

clarknokent:

You know she regrets this lmao

watch the whole video. no way she does.

It’s your juicy jewel of flavor, Ring Pop!

WATCH THE FUCKING VIDEO

I don’t understand??

Watch the ducking video guys

feeling-fantasmic:

uhh-khakis:

timelordblogging:

allofmylovetess:

dlubes:

clarknokent:

You know she regrets this lmao

watch the whole video. no way she does.

It’s your juicy jewel of flavor, Ring Pop!

WATCH THE FUCKING VIDEO

I don’t understand??

Watch the ducking video guys

(Source: shogunofyellow, via miannaboat)

Monday, September 22nd 2014
8:19 PM

smartgirlsattheparty:

zimbolt:

KILLED IT

Mic Drop. 

(Source: beeishappy, via xxxfreeasabirdxxx)

Monday, September 22nd 2014
4:42 PM

walkerflexxasranger:

"put ya tiddy in this ginger ale so i can take this picture…"

walkerflexxasranger:

"put ya tiddy in this ginger ale so i can take this picture…"

(Source: aquaticwonder, via bakedasasnake)

Monday, September 22nd 2014
4:35 PM

raychielsgifs:

kushandbeatz:

Tyson X Tupac
That fateful night in Vegas….

this gif is too much greatness. hate it had to be him.

raychielsgifs:

kushandbeatz:

Tyson X Tupac

That fateful night in Vegas….

this gif is too much greatness. hate it had to be him.

(via elle-world)

Monday, September 22nd 2014
4:31 PM

theroguefeminist:

permguerrero:

memes are people too 

I like how so any of them haven’t changed a bit—or got even memeier

(Source: deezyville, via pallet-town-julie-brown)

Sunday, September 21st 2014
5:17 PM

inature:

the-kush-dealer:

Nathan, Eminem, and their mother Debbie.

Fucking Rare

inature:

the-kush-dealer:

Nathan, Eminem, and their mother Debbie.

Fucking Rare

(via elle-world)

Sunday, September 21st 2014
5:10 PM

snark0lepsy:

The Whitest Kids U’ Know x

(via elle-world)

Sunday, September 21st 2014
4:36 PM

hippie-bittie:

jackalarcana:

ray-winters-sings:

ROLLIN AROUND AT THE SPEED OF SOUND. GOT PLACES TO GO GOTTA FOLLOW MA RAIINNBOWWWW. CAN’T STICK AROUNNND HAVE TO KEEEP MOVIN ONN. JUST WHAT LIES AHEAD ONLY ONNEEE WAYYY TO FIIIIIND OUUUUUTTT.

*LOUD SCRAPING NOISE*
*JARRING CRUNCH OF DESTROYED AUTOMOBILES THROWN INTO THE AIR BY A GODDAMN HEDGEHOG*
*FRUSTRATED CONTROLLER THROW AS YOU MISS THE LAST FUCKING RAMP AND HIT THAT GODDAMN TROLLEY*


My most favorite game in the whole wide world.

hippie-bittie:

jackalarcana:

ray-winters-sings:

ROLLIN AROUND AT THE SPEED OF SOUND. GOT PLACES TO GO GOTTA FOLLOW MA RAIINNBOWWWW. CAN’T STICK AROUNNND HAVE TO KEEEP MOVIN ONN. JUST WHAT LIES AHEAD ONLY ONNEEE WAYYY TO FIIIIIND OUUUUUTTT.

*LOUD SCRAPING NOISE*

*JARRING CRUNCH OF DESTROYED AUTOMOBILES THROWN INTO THE AIR BY A GODDAMN HEDGEHOG*

*FRUSTRATED CONTROLLER THROW AS YOU MISS THE LAST FUCKING RAMP AND HIT THAT GODDAMN TROLLEY*

My most favorite game in the whole wide world.

(Source: klefable)

Sunday, September 21st 2014
4:24 PM

Sundiata, Lion king of Mali The lion king The lion king Theatre production Sundiata, Afriky Lolo’s 2010 Mansa Musa grandson of Sundiata King Sundiata

nok-ind:

Sundiata Keita of Mali, The real lion king

The epic of king Sundiata Keita of Mali was the inspiration for the Disney film the lion king. However the film itself just scratched the surface of the richness in culture, heritage and history of the actual story.

‘David Winiewski’s 1992 picture book version of the african epic “Sundiata, Lion king of Mali” and the actual historical account of the 13th century lion king, Sundiata, are both badly served by Disney’s “The lion king”. Disney has been praised for using african animals as story characters; for using the African landscape as a story setting; for using African artwork as design motifs: and for using african- american actors as the voices for the film characters. If the film succeeds in having African culture accepted by people usually resistant to recognizing any other culture but their own, then it deserves to be noted for this small breach in the racial divide. Nevertheless, in the larger sense, the film diminishes the culturally rich heritage of history and story from which it derives. Sundiata was the 12th son of the king of Mali, and he was viewed by the kings “griot” as destined for greatness. He grew to manhood in exile, but he returned to fight the evil forces of his brother and return the kingdom to it’s rightful sovereignty. The film converts the real heroes private pain and struggle against truly wrenching physical and political disabilities into a screen situation of sentimental, tearjerker shallowness. An interdisciplinary approach would allow English and social studies teachers to present the epic from a historical and literary perspective.’ (Paterno 1994)

This story belongs to be amongst epics such as Gilgamesh from Mesopotamia, ancient Greek the Iliad, Aeneid of Italy and the wonderful story of Beowulf from Anglo-saxon literature.

This is a story of a True king who founded the west African kingdom of Mali an empire whose marvels left a bright heritage of culture, riches enlightenment and ancient wisdom. Infact one of the pearls of this empire Timbuktu, many times over ignited the imagination of western explorers and ironically this same splendour prompted European exploration of the west coast of Africa.

The most notable things from this empire Sundiata, Mansa Musa, Timbuktu, Gold, Islam, Ancient manuscripts, International trade and Commerce.

references :

Paterno, Domenica R.The True Lion King of Africa: The Epic History of Sundiata, King of Old Mali.Education Resources information Center.1994

http://812studio.com/i-love-these-posters/

(Source: fyeahblackhistory, via black-culture)

Saturday, September 20th 2014
3:31 PM

elige:

Open your MindOpen your Heart

elige:

Open your Mind
Open your Heart

(Source: doctorshulgin)

Friday, September 19th 2014
3:45 PM

Do your ears hang low? Do they wobble to and fro? Visit http://sennheiser-urbanite.com/en-US/1/ for a chance to win a free pair of Urbanite headphones.

(Source: youtube.com)

Friday, September 19th 2014
12:50 PM

thinkmexican:


Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

(via afro-dominicano)

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